Working as a dietitian in ICU can be challenging, not only because of the nutrition consequences patients experience as a result of inadequate nutrition intake, but also the consequences of illness and being in ICU that lead to poor nutrition, which can stay with patients far beyond their ICU stint.

In this podcast episode, we’re lucky enough to be joined by Senior Research Fellow and Senior Clinical ICU Dietitian, Dr Emma Ridley, to chat all things post-ICU nutrition.


Biography

Dr Emma Ridley is a Senior Research Fellow at the ANZIC-RC, Monash University where she leads the Nutrition Program and a Senior Clinical Dietitian in ICU at The Alfred Hospital. Completing her PhD in 2018, current research interests include understanding the optimum way to determine energy requirements in the critically ill, including the clinical application of indirect calorimetry, as well as the effect of optimal nutrition delivery on short and long-term outcomes in ICU patients. In 2019 Emma was named as a Finalist in the ‘Clinical Research’ category of the Premier’s Awards for Health and Medical Research for the work and outcomes within her PhD. Emma regularly delivers invited national and international presentations, is an Editor with Australian Critical Care and has authored 43 peer-reviewed publications, (including in the New England Journal of Medicine). Emma has been a named investigator on $6.3 million dollars of research funding with the teams she collaborates with and is the CIA on the INTENT trial that is investigating a whole hospital nutrition intervention in critically ill patients (NCT03292237).


In this episode, we discuss:

  • The nutritional consequences of being in ICU
  • Typical nutrition intake and barriers post-ICU
  • Recommended nutrition support post-ICU
  • Strategies to improve nutrition intake post-ICU
  • Nutrition support for COVID-19 patients post-ICU


Additional resources:

  • Click here to listen to Emma’s previous podcast on critically ill nutrition requirements
Access the papers:

This episode is supported byNestle Health Science Logo