Clare Collins 2014

Using and keeping up with technology can be challenging and confusing. From online programs that help APDs deliver and monitor medical nutrition therapy, to mobile applications that allow self-monitoring and real-time feedback and provide the evidence for improving client outcomes. This presentation will take you through some of the key tools and online resources that can save you time, deliver an enhanced client experience and improve your practice.

Using technology to deliver cutting edge, evidence based programs that facilitate behaviour change, increase client engagement and enhance outcomes should be our mandate. Smart technologies can help extend our reach and make it easier for our clients to choose healthy food, no matter where they live.  It’s up to us to embrace the opportunity that technology offers.

Webinar objectives:

To examine the best available evidence on the effectiveness of technology approaches to managing body weight.

To summarise currently available technologies that can enhance dietetic practice, including free and commercial tools; and

To give examples of how these can be integrated into medical nutrition therapy.

Presented by:

Clare Collins is a Professor of Nutrition and Dietetics in the School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine and Deputy Director, Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

Professor Collins has an H-index of 27, published over 200 manuscripts, has supervised over 20 APDs doing PhDs. Her research evaluates the impact of interventions to improve dietary intake on changes in eating patterns, weight and health across all ages and stages of life. Current research focusses on using smart technologies to achieve this. She created the online Healthy Eating Quiz that has provided real-time feedback on diet quality to more than 70,000 users to date and recently launched the Australian Eating Survey that provides real-time comparison of dietary intakes to national recommendations.

Professor Collins was a team leader on the systematic reviews for the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) that informed the revision of the 2013 NHMRC Australian Dietary Guidelines. She served on the Australia and New Zealand (ANZOS) council for 6 years, with 2 years as Vice President (2007-08). Professor Collins chaired development of DAA’s Best Practice Dietetic Guidelines for the Management of Adult Overweight and Obesity and led the University of Newcastle and DAA reference group updating these in 2011.

Prof Collins founded the [email protected] technology network at the University of Newcastle in 2012 and is academic leader for the University of Newcastle’s Global eHealth Research and Innovation Cluster.

Professor Collins is a Fellow of the Dietitians Association of Australian (DAA) and represents DAA on the international Practice Based Evidence in Nutrition (PEN) collaboration with Dietitians of Canada and the British Dietetic Association. Professor Collins has been a DAA media spokesperson for 15 years. She was a clinical paediatric dietitian for over 20 years at John Hunter Children’s Hospital.