One in seven adults suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is common throughout the world – Australia, the United States of America, Europe and many Asian countries. The condition is characterised by symptoms including bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, constipation and gastrointestinal wind.

 

The research team at the Monash University’s Department of Gastroenterology launched an iPhone app, the Monash University Low FODMAP diet, which provides accurate information about foods that trigger IBS symptoms. The app will assist IBS sufferers to effectively manage their symptoms. It will also provide IBS sufferers and health professionals with the most current information based on research.

 

Dr Jane Muir, Head of Translational Nutrition Science at Monash University, commented, “We think this application is unique because it is based on the scientific work at Monash. All foods have been tested carefully and scientifically meausured so the information is entirely accurate and not based on guess work or anecdotal evidence”.

 

The app includes:

  • A low FODMAP information booklet.
  • FODMAP information on hundreds of foods. The foods are listed using a traffic light system according to serve sizes. Red foods are high in FODMAPs and should be avoided, orange foods are moderate in FODMAPs and may be tolerated by some people, and green foods are low in FODMAPs and suitable for consumption. The specific food serving sizes is an essential tool for IBS sufferers, as it informs sufferers how much food can be safely consumed.
  • A recipe book that includes 79 low FODMAP recipes. This will assist clients to follow the diet.
  • A shopping list to assist individuals organise their low FODMAP purchases.
  • A one week challenge for trialling a low FODMAP diet. Clients can record the foods consumed and their symptoms. Clients can show this to their dietitian or doctor to assist in their symptom management.

 

The iPhone app will be updated every twelve months. The app will be available for android devices in early 2014. All proceeds from the sale of the app go to the Department of Gastroenterology at Monash University to fund further research.

 

Click here to access this app